Cameron’s renegotiation a ‘step back for Europe’

Cameron doesn’t just want a less equal Britain. His renegotiation is trying to win a less equal Europe too

2nd February 2016

Photo: Georgina Coupe Flickr

Photo: Georgina Coupe Flickr

Under the terms of David Cameron’s draft deal with Donald Tusk all EU states would be allowed to use an ’emergency brake’ on in work benefits if they could show that their social security system’s were being put under strain. This could mean terrible impoverishment for EU citizens working outside their home countries. And it will do nothing to answer Europe’s problems. But it does show how Britain’s eurosceptics don’t just want a less equal Britain – they want a less equal Europe too, pushing through policies that would allow any right wing government in Europe free reign to attack in-work benefits.

Luke Cooper, the convenor of Another Europe Is Possible said:

“A key benefit of European integration has always been that workers moving from one EU country to another should enjoy the same protections and rights as citizens of the home nation. The imposition of a so-called ’emergency brake clause’ on access of EU workers to social provisions is part of a dangerous race to the bottom to close borders happening across Europe. It is a step back for Europe.

“Xenophobia, nationalism, and more punitive restrictions on free movement rights do not answer a single one of Europe’s problems. While Another Europe Is Possible will be campaigning for Britain to stay in the European Union, we will continue to oppose any attack on the rights of migrant workers.

“With 1.8 million British citizens living in EU states we should not think of this as something that only affects migrants from Poland and other EU countries living in the UK. A more open, tolerant, and genuinely social Europe is called for now more than ever.”